Ethics in Medicine

Critically, different countries have different ethical values that are established by their population when a comparison is made to the values that are demonstrated and taught by the public health professional that is coming from another country. In this case, ethical dilemma normally arises as a result of ethical values appearing to be at odds or when a specific situation is presenting problems to how one is able to apply ethical values when it comes to reaching advantageous solutions (Benatar & Brock, 2011). Giving an example of a doctor from Kenya who fails to attend to Gay patients in the United States, the country where he is recently posted in for some advanced training is an ethical dilemma since two ethical standards are conflicting. Denying to attend to the gay client is actually conflicting with the doctor’s professional commitment when it comes to promotion of patients well ; being. In this case, there exist pure health dilemmas since the ethical standards conflicts.

Medical Ethics Cases

Technically according to the existing principles of global health ethics in Ethical Standards, that clearly explains that denying to see a patient who critically needs medical attention and help, will potentially lead to a serious conflict when it comes to the wellbeing of the client promotion. Basically this dilemma can be effectively solved through referring to (Ethical Standard 4.01), it clearly shows that doctors under training is allowed to accept employment ;on the reference to the competence that is in existence or with an intentional desire when it comes to acquiring the necessary competence, and considering the health professionalism, which includes all the countries globally; a client who needs a serious health attendance should not totally be discriminated according to gender, age ,color, religion, sex and belief system (A, 2010). ;Generally the doctor undergoing training is supposed to accept the case, taking consideration of the larger difference when it comes to different traditions and belief system, putting discussion on the present limit to his belief with the client and taking the responsibility of being trained and in the long run consulting more from his supervisor in the foreign country; (Benatar ; Brock, 2011). According to the global ethical code, the health care practitioner has the professional obligation of following the existing legal requirement and protecting the vulnerable. In this case, the doctor under training should consider confidentiality when it comes to issues that might make the patient be more vulnerable especially the social ones (Macklin, 2012).

Additionally, taking consideration of a country with totally different ethical values and morals where they perceive gays as a culturally eroded individual and a taboo in the society. The Doctor under training should, in the long run, arrive at a sound resolution, considering the moral standard of that specific country. Actually, a lot of things are supposed to be considered for example the ;values, morals, policies involved and the legal issues that are existing in that specific country (Pinto ; Upshur, 2013). This in the long will differentiate between professional dimensions available and the personal dimension to help in the decision making. Basically, in this case, the dilemma can be solved ensuring confidentiality and helping the patient without exposing the vulnerable side.

Lastly, applying the principle of global health ethics contribute to a positive social change since it is able to provide a relation between the professional and personal dimension through identifying the ethical, legal and moral values to be considered in most actions and situations (Stephany, 2012).;

Reference

A, B., Steven. (2010). Ethical Issues and Security Monitoring Trends in Global Healthcare: Technological Advancements: Technological Advancements. IGI Global.

Benatar, S., ; Brock, G. (2011). Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press.

Macklin, R. (2012). Ethics in Global Health: Research, Policy and Practice. OUP USA.

Pinto, A. D., ; Upshur, R. E. G. (2013). An Introduction to Global Health Ethics. Routledge.

Stephany, K. (2012). The Ethic of Care: A Moral Compass for Canadian Nursing Practice. Bentham Science Publishers.