Teacher Reflection

First and foremost, schools should be learning communities where teacher improvement comes from a plethora of sources. Generally speaking, teachers often focus on the content, materials needed, and the activities necessary for the lesson. As I walked in Ms. Franklin’s classroom I was greeted by the classroom Ambassador. Observing Ms. Franklin’s class she had everything mapped out on her board.

Her board consisted of the agenda, a time frame of the agenda that needed to be ompleted in that particular class period, notes, classwork, homework, and an objective. She continually circulated the room as she was teaching. When students were seemingly off task, she used proximity to keep students on task. The students who understood the assignment were to make sure others in their group understood what they were doing as well. Ms. Franklin addressed a group and individual students who were off task.

When students were taking notes, she circulated the oom to make sure they were taking notes accurately. For the group activity, she assigned roles for the students. She also had material managers’ report to her to get supplies. She met with the time keepers to instruct them as to when the groups should be finished with their assignment. Ms. Franklin could have considered making the assignment more rigorous for the students. It was a great idea to have students work together on completing the function rule and displaying on a piece of chart paper.

Perhaps providing a question that will push their thinking slightly further would lend to conversations that you will want to have in a group. She could also consider that once students get into their groups, allow a least a minute for them to decide on their groups roles and write names on their sheets. Overall Ms. Franklin has meet any standard that I expected of her. It was a pleasure of sitting and observing her classroom skills and teaching skills. I would definitely use her as a guidance of teaching